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Thursday, September 07, 2006

Georgia Student On Low-Carb For Two Days

You gotta love these student journalists who write cutesy little op-ed pieces about livin' la vida low-carb for their college newspapers.

"Look mom, I'm a real writer now and I'm using that power to spread the most bizarre ideas about what the low-carb lifestyle is so I can show just how ignorant I really am!"

Ahhhhh, the joys of being so young and yet so clueless.

We've seen it a few times before at universities across America:

- Arizona State
- Ohio University
- University of Wisconsin
- Illinois State University

But there have been a couple of intelligent students praising low-carb:

- University of North Carolina-Greensboro
- University of Buffalo

Today another college student steps up to the plate to talk about low-carb and gives a rather mixed bag in his column "Low carb separates men from boys. It was written by University of Georgia columnist Daniel Hanna for The Red And Black independent student newspaper.

Hanna states in his column that he started livin' la vida low-carb earlier this week, but it only "lasted two days." LOL! Two WHOLE days! Hee hee! Daniel, my friend, you hardly got started on your low-carb diet, dude. Anyone who has ever started on low-carb KNOWS it takes a MINIMUM of two weeks to get your body into ketosis during the Induction phase, so two days eating this way does not a diet make.

"My entire eating routine had been slashed, replaced by a monotonous array of milk, eggs and cold cuts."

Milk? On the low-carb lifestyle? That's not low-carb, Daniel boy. Sure, eggs and cold cuts are, but that's not all you get to eat. Where are your vegetables, nuts, steaks, cheese, etc.? There's so much more to this lifestyle change if you simply pick up a book and read about it rather than mindlessly criticize it sight unseen.

Hanna then moves to the subject of eggs and turkey.

"After Day One, I was tired of eggs, which gave me a solid 10-minute window of fullness. Not to mention the cholesterol (I mean, you have to watch your cholesterol). Meanwhile, the stacks of plain turkey breast failed to satisfy my hunger, while the no-carb protein shakes left a milky film on my tongue."

If you are only feeling full from eggs for ten minutes after eating them, Daniel, then you are not eating enough eggs. If you microwave several eggs in the morning for breakfast and put a little cheese on top, then you will find you will not get hungry for hours. Studies have shown that eggs fill you up and you actually consume less calories the rest of the day which leads to weight loss.

And good grief, stop worrying about cholesterol consumption because that does not make your cholesterol go up! Read this amazing book my friend and you'll learn all about it.

If you are eating turkey breast and you're still hungry, then you need to eat a little more until you are. And for goodness sake, don't get the lean or "fat-free" turkey breast slices, go for the full-fat version to get the fat your body needs to remain satisfied. Research just this week has shown eating more protein can actually lead to the production of a hormone in your body to suppress your appetite. So EAT, Daniel, EAT! If you are keeping your portions and calories too low, OF COURSE you're gonna be hungry!

Oh, and that "milky film" on your tongue. It has nothing to do with those protein shakes you are drinking (and they are not "no-carb" by the way!). That's the excess ketones that are released when you begin to reduce your carbohydrate intake and go on a ketogenic diet, which means your carbs are below 50g daily.

Not surprisingly, our friend Daniel gave up on his "low-carb diet" (again, two days is hardly being on the low-carb lifestyle), but an article in FLEX magazine at least gets him to acknowledge that this way of eating may not be as bad for people as he portrayed it.



Hanna said the article he read in FLEX magazine revealed that a low-carb diet can help provide the protein your body needs to bulk up and grow muscle mass while reducing body fat.

And it's true! This study from Dr. Donald Layman found that a low-carb/high-protein diet not only helps you lose fat, but also gain muscle. That's why so many athletes are eating this way nowadays to get the best performance out of their bodies. That's one of the reasons independent researcher Anthony Colpo started his Low-Carb Muscle Forum recently.

While Hanna said this news about low-carb and high-protein diets is intriguing, there is still concern over the "negative effects of carbohydrate depletion on the body’s muscle mass." But he again points to the FLEX magazine column that said that is bogus information. And actually, this study demonstrated that common theory is invalid.

Hanna said the FLEX magazine article said livin' la vida low-carb is mainly for bodybuilders and not necessarily for people involved in cardiovascular physical activities such as running and sports. Oh really! Try telling that to this low-carber who runs marathons. My own daily workouts are NEVER fueled by carbohydrates, but rather by the fat and protein I consume both before and after the workout. I wouldn't think of eating any other way for my exercise.

Towards the end of his column, Hanna explained that there are so many different version of low-carb out there for people to try that there is bound to be one that will work for you. Unfortunately, though, he chose to highlight one of the worst low-carb diets on the market today--"The Carbohydrate Addict's Diet!"

Here's how Hanna enthusiastically described this plan:

"One example is the 'carb-cycling' program, a stepsister of the low-carb diet that allows you to have your carbohydrate fix while simultaneously shredding away fat. Specifically, a carb-cycling program may call for two days of no-carb dieting followed by one day of carb-loading. The three-day sequence keeps your metabolism guessing, which equates to more fat burned. Moreover, the carb-loading day will satisfy any lingering pasta cravings, preparing you for the 48-hour stretch ahead."

Do I need to tell you why this is a bad idea? Your body needs to get out of the rollercoaster ride that eating too many carbohydrates puts your blood sugar on. DON'T DO IT! My recommendations for a legitimate low-carb plan include the Atkins diet, Protein Power, South Beach, and The Zone, just to name a few of the better ones.

Finally, at the end of his column, Hanna makes an excellent point:

"Pick the diet that works for you, and complement it with the right kind of exercise. As the Austrian Oak once wrote, the 'basic principles of nutrition are as valuable to a bodybuilder as the basic principles of training.' Bodybuilder or not, exercise and nutrition are complements, and powerful tools. If you can use them correctly."

Okay Daniel, you redeemed yourself with that last paragraph, my friend. Perhaps there is hope for you yet. But the next time you decide to go on a low-carb diet, try reading about it first, committing to it for at least 30 days, doing it with all your might, and refusing to give up just because it hurts. Sure it does at first. We've all been there before. But, for me, it was well worth it to lose 180 pounds in one year!

NOW THAT'S RESULTS, don't ya think, Daniel?

Send your feedback to Daniel Hanna regarding his op-ed piece by e-mailing his editor.

9-9-06 UPDATE: Daniel Hanna responds to my blog post.

"Mr. Moore, I respect your wealth of knowledge on the subject of the low-carb diet, but I believe you misunderstood my article. I admit, if my intention was to portray the intricacies of 'livin' la vida low-carb,' the article was a miserable failure.

However, that was not my intention; my purpose was to right a column that would serve as an abstract of sorts on a low-carb article written by a nutritionist expert (Dr. Tabatha Elliott). The introduction, which depicts my tried-but-failed approach to the low-carb diet, was intended to be 'cutesy' and in no-way taken seriously.

In fact, I hoped the anecdote would reach out to students who shared a similar story--who may have tried an on-the-spot low-carb plan and failed out of frustration (and lack of information). Hopefully, those students would be inspired to research the truths about 'livin' la vida low carb,' and formulate a nutrition plan which meets their own needs.

Thank you for the feedback. Stay healthy, and best of luck. Sincerely, Daniel Hanna "


THANKS for writing, Daniel, and I appreciate the explanation. But if you go back to the top of this blog post and click on any of the other college links I provided to the student journalists who portray low-carb as this awful way to eat, then you will know why I had to respond to you. Even if you were just trying to relate to your fellow college students, that was not the way to do it.

Wanna be bold, Daniel? How about sharing with your classmates there at the University of Georgia about what livin' la vida low-carb REALLY is?! From start to finish in a column, no holds barred, THE TRUTH about low-carb living. I'd be happy to help you with this as well as the tens of thousands of visitors to my blog. Are you up to it, Daniel? It's your move now.

9-10-06 UPDATE: On a whim, I decided to give my feedback to the editor of The Red And Black. They decided to post my response at the bottom of the column. Here's what I wrote:

Why is it that student journalists almost always seem to portray the low-carb lifestyle as an awful way to eat? Sure, if you read most media accounts of what low-carb is, then I suppose you would come to the conclusion that eating "meat, eggs, and cheese" is decidedly unhealthy.

But take it from someone who has lost over 180 pounds on low-carb and kept it off for two years, it's so much more than that.

Daniel Hanna very likely meant no harm with his article sharing his experience on a low-carb diet, but he has done a disservice to all of us who did it the right way.

Wanna be a bold and daring student journalist, Daniel? Then how about sharing with your classmates there at the University of Georgia about what livin' la vida low-carb is REALLY all about?!

From start to finish in a column, no holds barred, sharing THE TRUTH and nothing but the truth about low-carb living.

I'd be happy to help you with this as well as the tens of thousands of visitors I receive at my blog.

Are you up to it, Daniel? Do you dare share the wisdom and knowledge of others who have gone before and been success on low-carb?

It's your move now.

Jimmy Moore, author of "Livin' La Vida Low-Carb"
livinlowcarbman@charter.net
LivinLaVidaLowCarb.com
Spartanburg, SC


You can share your feedback on this column, too, by clicking here.

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13 Comments:

Blogger Michelle said...

LoL, it makes me wonder where Mr. Daniel Hanna found his information from. I mean did he even READ the atkins book?? Most likely not, because he wouldnt have given up after only 2 DAYS! 2 FREAKING DAYS! thats not even a start! haha

anyways you tell 'em Jimmy!

9/08/2006 1:45 AM  
Blogger megadittles said...

Love this one. Yeah, maybe egg flavored poptarts gave the 10 minute window of energy. I find that to be most true.
I'm up and running again this morning. 3 eggs, cheese, and turkey bacon. Coffee with full fat half & half. Mmmm...I'm working my way back babe!

9/08/2006 8:01 AM  
Blogger Gary J said...

Regarding the Flex cover photo: I have never understood my men want to look like lobsters. Anybody know? Just asking...

9/08/2006 8:45 AM  
Blogger Kevin Dill said...

in regards to bodybyuilders and why,... if I have to explain, you'll never understand. It is is however the same reason people climb mountains, and race motorcycles.

On a different note, why is it that people who do Atkins version of low carb have, trouble acknowledging that there is more than one way of approaching a low carb lifestyle?

9/08/2006 9:25 AM  
Blogger Jimmy Moore said...

LOL! I know what you mean, Kevin. But I always tell people to do whatever works for them and then keep doing it for the rest of their life. I think what frustrates many of us low-carbers are these people who claim to do "low-carb" or "Atkins" and have never even cracked open the book.

9/08/2006 9:40 AM  
Blogger Bowulf said...

Heck in two days, he wouldn't have made it through Induction flu (if he was doing Atkins or eating low enough carbs, granted Kevin). That's like stopping a marathon at the starters' gate and wondering why you didn't win a prize. (This just happens to be the topic of what I am working on as well.) Real journalism if attempting to speak first hand might have insisted he actually run the race a little bit further before commenting on it or at least be on the race course. (and not running on his own self-prescribed course!)

9/08/2006 9:59 AM  
Blogger Daniel said...

Mr. Moore,
I respect your wealth of knowledge on the subject of the low-carb diet, but I believe you misunderstood my article. I admit, if my intention was to portray the intricacies of "livin' la vida low-carb," the article was a miserable failure. However, that was not my intention; my purpose was to right a column that would serve as an abstract of sorts on a low-carb article written by a nutritionist expert (Dr. Tabatha Elliott). The introduction, which depicts my tried-but-failed approach to the low-carb diet, was intended to be "cutesy" and in no-way taken seriously. In fact, I hoped the anecdote would reach out to students who shared a similar story--who may have tried an on-the-spot low-carb plan and failed out of frustration (and lack of information). Hopefully, those students would be inspired to research the truths about "livin' la vida low carb," and formulate a nutrition plan which meets their own needs.
Thank you for the feedback.
Stay healthy, and best of luck.

Sincerely,
Daniel Hanna

9/08/2006 6:40 PM  
Blogger Cindy said...

I'd like to give Mr Hanna a few lessons on what some of us really eat!!!

9/09/2006 2:51 PM  
Blogger tarek said...

You offer an interesting perspective on low carb dieting.

However, in addressing the carb cycling diet you mention, "Your body needs to get out of the rollercoaster ride that eating too many carbohydrates puts your blood sugar on." In fact, a normal individual experiences minimal (if any) fluctuations in their blood sugar while eating carbs or even simple sugars. Only a diabetic (or "pre-diabetic") would experience blood sugar fluctuations of this sort.

In a similar vein, you link to another blog entry that states "Livin' la vida low-carb has been found to be the only effective means for treating metabolic syndrome..." Yikes! Oral hypoglycemic drugs? Statins? Anti-hypertensives? Good old-fashion excercise? Low calorie dieting?

Perhaps visting your friendly family physician is a better place to seek medical advice.

9/09/2006 10:17 PM  
Blogger Jimmy Moore said...

Tarek,

THANK YOU for commenting, but let me clarify my comment regarding metabolic syndrome. Perhaps I should have said low-carb is the "only effective NATURAL means for treating metabolic sydrome."

Sure, all of those things you listed can help as well, but I certainly don't need my anti-low-carb family doctor turning to those options FIRST over livin' la vida low-carb. There are too many advantages from low-carb living for it to be discarded as useless. It is not.

9/09/2006 10:24 PM  
Blogger Bowulf said...

Tarek: Are you stating that norm individuals do not have fluctuations after eating simple sugars? Have you eaten a Krispy kreme or two lately? Have you not felt the blaise feeling or lethargy afterwards? I have a department of non-diabetics respond negatively to donut day at the office whenever they are brought in. Why do you think the doctor prescribes a fast before testing your bloodwork, perhaps to eliminate such a spike from distorting the results? Why do a lot of people face the 4 pm blahs every day if not because the blood sugars have dropped?

To say only diabetics face blood glucose highs and valleys is simply wrong.

9/10/2006 12:07 AM  
Blogger LindaLCforLife said...

Tarek:

You said "In fact, a normal individual experiences minimal (if any) fluctuations in their blood sugar while eating carbs or even simple sugars. Only a diabetic (or "pre-diabetic") would experience blood sugar fluctuations of this sort."

How does one become pre-diabetic/diabetic? Your body's ability to handle excess carbohydrates depends largely on your age, your genes and the biochemistry you inherited. The human body has the ability to compensate for a lot of abuse and may do quite well for a time, and again it depends on the individual, but eventually most people pay the price.

NIDDM (non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus) makes up 90% of all diabetic cases. Peak onset is 50 to 60 years of age, usually accompanied by obesity and diagnosed using lab tests that indicate glucose intolerance. You can find that in any medical dictionary, but it develops in the human body over a prolonged period of time, 50 to 60 years, in recent years even less. The human body doesn't become glucose intolerant overnight anymore than many of the other complex processes it goes through in a lifetime do.

A little over 100 years ago, before the manufacture of refined white sugar and flour and processed foods, before oral hypoglycemic drugs, statins, anti-hypertensives, before low calorie/low fat and dieting, before fat phobia was ever heard of, metabolic syndrome/NIDDM and arteriosclerotic heart disease from plaque-clogged arteries did not exist and never had before. The first myocardial infarction was documented sometime in the 1920s, about 20 years after the introduction of refined sugar and flour in the American diet.

The main treatment for diabetes is diet, i.e., drastic restriction of carbohydrates. Based on the recent research I've seen regarding the excess consumption of bad carbohydrates related to the development of diabetes, heart disease and a host of other maladies, I am going to restrict mine to low-carb veges, low-carb fruits and other healthy low carb foods before I develop a deadly disease, not after; and before I need to start taking deadly drugs like antihyperglycemic drugs, statins, antihypertensives, etc., not after.

9/10/2006 3:24 PM  
Blogger LindaLCforLife said...

If your planning to visit your friendly family doctor you might want to check beforehand on their track record for treatment of diabetes with conservative methods. I think you'll find they haven't had much success, even with patient compliance.

9/10/2006 4:50 PM  

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